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Hello to all.


My wife's '09 XB was exhibiting grinding noises aligned with wheel turn in left rear wheel, during and after breaking at low speeds as well as low accelerating speeds after stops.

I know little of cars and brakes, but took the wheel off, (needed to use the sledge on the rubber due to it being "frozen" on, as there was more rust than I expected back there) and had a look.

After reading up and watching videos, I pulled the disc brake assembly off to see what the condition of the pads were, and got only as far as the outer pad. The perimeter of the pad along the arc closest to the axle was still 3/16" thick, whereas the perimeter of the pad along the outer arc, closest to tire, was not even there anymore, and the metal of the brake shoe had eroded the rotor, (which I occasionally see today called the disc). I understand the rotor can be turned to true it up, and that too much turning may result in potential warping of the rotor. The condition of the pad/shoe and rotor seem ridiculously far from precise to me, and when I asked my car tinkering neighbor about it, he said this could be caused by air in the brake line, bad hose, or bad caliper. Strangely, the guy from orange and white auto parts supply house said it's normal, and to be getting wear on the brake pads is a good thing(?).

After reassembling, I heard that I should be able to work the caliper action with my hand when disconnected from the mount, and this action runs along the two caliper guide pins (which I've seen today caller slider pins). My caliper didn't seem too limber, though I didn't know to try this when it was free. I watched some vids of people taking these out and cleaning them up and using the toothpaste tube-sized tube of synthetic lube to free up this action. It seems easy enough.

There were three thin shims behind the one pad, but I read somewhere to use whichever, and however many shims come with the new pads.

I thought that I should do this myself, and do the left and right rear brakes and get a couple new rotors while I'm at it. (Seems like the job of turning a rotor should be comparable to the price of a new one, and even if not, I'd feel better about keeping up to date on both sides, and I should do something more than once to learn.

QUESTION 1: Is there anything wrong with getting new rotors and two sets of pads and maybe some slider pin lube and doing this myself? The only thing I read about now that causes me to consider not doing it is the "bedding" and "breaking in process" of the pads.

QUESTION 2: Which would be the best brand choice for pads and rotors? I've read a little about noise (now I see why I saw three thin shims, to keep it quieter) and OEMs (being better metal?).

I only typed this much to give an accurate idea of what I've read and what I saw when the abyss looked back.

Bri-on
 

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The rear brake pads have be installed a certain way. There is a small pin on the brake pad that MUST align with the cavity on the piston. If the pin touches of the pad doesnt go into the cavity, and hits the surface of the piston, then uneven pad wear will be automatic. The outer arc closer to the tire will wear alot faster than the inside arc. That would cause your rotor to grind agains the metal plate of the pad. To save money, measure your rotors and compare them to spec. If you have enough thickness left, then get your rotors resurfaced at your local repair shop. Install new pads aswell. If money is not an issue, then replace rear pads and rotors. Lubricate all metal friction points on the pads and caliper bracket during installation. Relubricate the guide pins aswell. Make sure that the pin aligns in the cavity of the piston or you will result in uneven wear pad wesr again.

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Doing brakes is easier than you think. If you think youll get lost. Use ur cell and take pics of each step or lart you remove. Then look at em backwards to reassemble. Best thing about digital. Can delete when your done. Plus. A huge difference in brake feel would be to also flush your fluid. Run a whole bottle through and flush all cour corners. Getting new rotors and pads and possibly calipers (the most expensive part) is not a bad idea at all. Then you will know exactly where your are at with them. My personal rule of thumb is wearing out two sets of pads per rotor. So new rotors every other set of pads. Getting rotors turned just pisses me off, shops always take off too much. You only need to skin cut then til true.

Good luck with your brake job. Sounds like your on the right track.
 

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I redid my brakes last spring on my 09. My left rear was the issue as well. It seemed like the pad wouldn't retract on the outside and it quickly wore out the rotor. I went ahead and changed out all 4 while I was at it. The fronts weren't worn out, but were about due for a change anyway.

The hardest part of the whole job was removing the front rotors. They were really stuck on there. If you look closely near the hub you will see two threaded holes. If your rotors are stuck, you can thread bolts in there to force them off the hubs.

Don't forget the tool to turn the rear pistons back into the calipers.
 
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