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I am so glad I live on the east coast where it basically never gets dry enough for stuff to burn for days on end..

Gotta feel for the folks caught in it out west, though.
 

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Oh man, I think today is the worst it's been, air quality wise.... Our office has an open-air hallway w/ skylights. Due to the extreme amount of smoke, it's causing shafts of light to beam into the hallway through the smoke. People in my office are saying it smells like we're camping and everyone putting out their camp fires. I'm sure when I get home, my shirt will smell like I've been BBQing all day. Not only is the smoke bad, but we're in triple digit heat! They say that the smoke will keep the temps down, but I'd much rather have those few degrees back! This is bad... :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
satellite image of fire area

check out this satellite image of the fire are in Northern California’s Klamath National Forest on June 21, 2008 [described below]:




Siskiyou Complex Fire, Northern California

Lightning triggered a complex of forest fires in Northern California’s Klamath National Forest on June 21, 2008. As of July 14, this group of fires, known as the Siskiyou Complex, had grown to affect an estimated 35,400 acres and was about 16 percent contained, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. Firefighters were preparing for at least another month of battle with the blaze.

This false-color image was made from visible and infrared data collected by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on July 13. The image centers on the largest of the fires in the Siskiyou Complex, which is the Dark Three Fire. The burned area is charcoal-colored, while surrounding forest and other vegetation is red. Water is dark blue. The western perimeter of the fire is hidden by smoke.

The fires are burning in very rugged and steep terrain with few roads and with stands of large trees. Although the area is not very populated, the forest is the site of significant Karuk and Yurok Tribal cultural and religious sites, which are at risk.

Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team
 
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