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I pickup my 2012 xB from the exhaust builder today. He had the xB on the rack and ask if I installed this. He was pointing at the TRD rear sway-bar. I told him yes, he then ask me how it works. I said it's a sway-bar you know they work. He said I know how sway-bars work but how does this one work? He then pointed out that it's mounted to a solid axle and to arms that are mounted to this solid axle. It then hit me, **** he's right. :confused:

Wouldn't a sway-bar work better if it was mounted to the axle then to the body?

AZ
 

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Toyota shouldn't call it a sway bar. It's actually a rear stifiner that adds 200 in/lb of spring rate or at least that's what Hotchkiss says it is. From looking at the TRD one it looks like the same thing.
 

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Think of it this way: the rear springs hold up the rear of the car. The beam axle acts to define the rotation axis of the rear suspension arms, but also allows each arm to move somewhat independent of the other. The "somewhat" is because the beam introduces a torsion spring force during cornering, since the beam axle is twisted and resists the rear arms moving in opposite directions. So when the outside rear wheel is loaded and moving up, the inside unloaded wheel is moving down. Voila, the rear wheels are resisting each other due to the twisting beam axle - the inside wheel is increasing the spring rate of the outside wheel via the beam axle.

The rear sway bar simply increases this effect, and makes it tuneable since different bars can be used.

Beam axles are cheaper than true independent suspensions. The stiffer the beam axle and/or sway bar, the less that end of the car behaves like independent suspension. It's a compromise.
 
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