Scion XB Forum banner
1 - 20 of 140 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know ways to improve gas mileage, but do you guys have any suggestions?

1. Check tire pressures
2. Keep up with regular service maintenance (including filters)
3. Remove unnecessary items from your trunk
4. Let your car get up to speed SMOOTHLY --- do not RACE you engine
5. Run SYNTHETIC OIL in your engine (I read this from oil companies and local retailers)
6. Keep the exterior of you car CLEAN and SMOOTH (I read this from www.chemicalguys.com). Cleaner car will have less drag when its running.
 

·
Royal Floor Sweeper
Joined
·
4,338 Posts
Drag is something that becomes more significant w/ greater speed.
Up to a point, the overall aerodynamic drag of the design makes the only significant difference. Around 70 or 80 (or so) other smaller stuff comes into play, like windows open/closed, roof racks, and large stuff. Closer to 100-120, small stuff comes into play.
Unless you are running well over 80 on a regular basis, a somewhat dirty exterior isn't that relevant (any aero advantage is too small to matter). It does matter at higher speeds, but I doubt it is significant at speeds I drive.

The biggest factor for mileage is RPMs and how the driver uses them. I drive fairly aggressive, but get decent mileage for my terrain. One advantage is that I drive on steady speed country roads too, so traffic is only an issue w/in towns (but is BAD in the town where my kids have school/daycare). Most of the cruising MPG issue in my area is hills, of which there are a plethora- literally, they are everywhere. Going up them hurts mileage as I don't pick up enough speed (speed limits) to coast up the other side. So, it isn't nearly as good as flatlanders inherently have for mileage.

A much more significant factor right now is all the ethanol fuel companies are putting in their gas. A local report found one station (a Shell) using 40% Ethanol in regular gas. That will cost more mileage than anything my foot does (short of racing my box).

Right now, the most significant factors in fuel economy:
- Fuel composition (moonshine is for drinking and is NOT good for our engines, nor efficient)
- Driver's use of gas/brake pedals
- Terrain (the flatter the more efficient)
- Tire pressure is w/in correct range (not under or over inflated)
- Maintenance, fluids all moving efficiently w/in the engine, tranny, and so forth
- Reduce overall weight in your car/vehicle (if carrying a lot of extra crap, put on level w/ terrain)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
One more rule:

Under 35 mph (~56 kph), windows down
Over 35 mph, use A/C

This all goes with the whole drag thing as well; The drag, because of the open windows, up to 35mph is going to make less of an impact on mpg than the A/C would. Concordantly, anywhere above 35, the drag is enough that it outweighs the impact made by A/C.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
I have done a few mods to mine and I get 31 mpg out of it now. I run Mobile 1, tires are aired up to 40-42 psi,smooth acceleration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Aljay said:
...tires are aired up to 40-42 psi,smooth acceleration.
Won't that increase the wear in your suspension, and decrease the life of your tire?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
EPHIOS said:
Aljay said:
...tires are aired up to 40-42 psi,smooth acceleration.
Won't that increase the wear in your suspension, and decrease the life of your tire?
Nope rotate tires often. I have 20 k on the stock tires. Actually I just about am ready to put the last of the new tires on I have 30k on the rears they are right at the limit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
jrl91789 said:
I'd say 26-28 is a good enough, not being a leadfoot helps... :rofl:
Tires tell the story mine are perfectly flat all the way across .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
EPHIOS said:
I know ways to improve gas mileage, but do you guys have any suggestions?

1. Check tire pressures
2. Keep up with regular service maintenance (including filters)
3. Remove unnecessary items from your trunk
4. Let your car get up to speed SMOOTHLY --- do not RACE you engine
5. Run SYNTHETIC OIL in your engine (I read this from oil companies and local retailers)
6. Keep the exterior of you car CLEAN and SMOOTH (I read this from www.chemicalguys.com). Cleaner car will have less drag when its running.
Old thread, but still.

Not so sure #6 will make a practical difference, but coasting will -- down slopes, into red or soon to be red lights, into stop signs, etc.

Also, keep a light foot on the throttle and minimize changes. When moving out from a stop (or moving into a higher speed zone), allow the car to accelerate in a relaxed manner. The guy in the next lane may beat you (and probably will given the popularity of charging out of stops), but so what?

Use the highest gear that's comfortable for the engine. For example, 1st is fine for getting the car rolling, but then it's time for 2nd -- don't wait. 3rd gear works great for 15mph, 4th gear for 25mph, and 5th for 35mph -- the engine is very torquey, take advantage of that. (Obviously, some conditions require lower gears -- so don't go by speed alone.)

It's OK to modestly overinflate your tires, but keep it modest. Yes, overinflation reduces rolling resistance, but it also reduces tread contact patch and hence road grip. Significant overinflation not only results in accelerated center tread wear, but more importantly, reduced road adhesion during emergency manouvering -- MPG is not more important than road safety.

My 2 cents :)!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
477 Posts
I agree that tire inflation is probably one of the most important way to improve MPG. Another thing an overly inflated tire will do is beat your suspension to death, causing part to fail faster. Might even cause windshields to crack.

Once you are in the final drive gear, you will be getting your best MPG. The more speed after that will cause the MPG to decrease because of wind resistance and your motor rotating faster using more gasoline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
I'd say tire inflation is the most significant "passive" way to improve MPG, but given at least reasonable tire pressure, the real burden comes down to the driver and the way he/she drives. If you want to achieve your best gas mileage, then drive in a way consistent with that goal :)!

Speaking for myself, I rarely have the need to seriously press on my accelerator. Very small perturbations cover me for most situations -- I just provide a touch of accelerator and allow the car to catch up, which it does quite handily. However, if the need arises, I can apply just a moderate pressure and my xB2 will pretty much leap to my bidding. The xB2 has a very good powerplant and engine upgrades can make a remarkable improvement in its willingness to respond. The key with MPG is not the engine or the mods, it's the driver.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
jrl91789 said:
I'd say 26-28 is a good enough, not being a leadfoot helps... :rofl:
Where did the 26-28 (psi) come from? The stock tire should be 35 psi for the front and 32 for the rear...or am I reading the door jam sticker wrong?
The part about not being a "leadfood" is the best advise for better mph.

Brewski
 

·
Royal Floor Sweeper
Joined
·
4,338 Posts
I want to add one element to this discussion . . .

The VVT-i is a "smart" engine. The "i" stands for "intelligent," not "injection." What that means is that the ECU "learns" the drivers driving pattern. So, if one "hypermiles" their xB, or any VVT-i powered vehicle, the engine optimizes that where it shifts and puts the RPMs. As such, if one uses the previously mentioned tactics to optimize fuel economy, the vehicle will continue that too making it even better.

The reverse works too . . .
If one drives like a "bat-outta-hell," the ECU learns that too, making the xB optimized for power. I've used the "shifter mode" n my automatic (bought as the wife HATES stick/manual, which my Miata is and I wanted her to be able to drive more than one of our 3 vehicles) so much that in full-auto, it will "lay a wheel" (slightly) when stomped and will actually "bounce" off the rev-limiter . . .
(There is a reason my xB is named -recently and hopefully finally- "KwikSilver.")

So, the xB will help you do what you want, whether to optimize economy or performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
846 Posts
I have found over the years that most recommendations about MPG is correct. The driver's habits is the most important.This Engine is very torquerky.I say this because I had a Tundra V6 and the shift timing was way different. This 4cyl puts out more torque.When starting off just a slight nudge on the clutch with hardly any throttle input and I am rolling. A shift to the next gear is next at 4 mph, and so on.The truck needed a down shift to 2Nd when making a turn where as the xB2 to 3rd. On the road, my box runs in 5Th gear after 45mph and hills aren't much of a problem unless there is a lot stuff in the back.I get around 24.5 mpg in the city and 32 mpg. on the road. The got 16 in the city and maybe 22 on the road in the truck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Ok so I took my xb on its 1st rd trip since I lowered it put exhaust and a cai on. I drove 72 mph pretty much steady for 187 miles @ 2700 rpm I avg 23 mpg wtf that sucks before all that I would avg 27 mpg on the freeway. Any thoughts?
 
1 - 20 of 140 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top